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The New Regime Coups In A Destined Direction

Posted by Scotio on December 7, 2008

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So, Nine Inch Nails has a new drummer coming up. And, it’s a guy that’s under 21 years old. Interesting considering the shoes that the kid will have to fill from those that came before him. Ilan Rubin is his name. And, more interesting is the fact that he has a solo record. Did I mention that the guy has also been playing the drumming role for lostprophets since their drumming position was left open? Already possessing a very impressive record all before he’s even legally allowed to drink in the USA, young mister Rubin seems to be a force to look out for. This review is on his solo album titled Coup. His “band” name is The New Regime. I use the quotation marks around the word band because he seems to have taken a number out of his new boss’s page in recording the record: performed all the instruments himself. Though there are tons of kids coming out of the woodworks with their “bedroom band” ideas, this isn’t one of them. It’s as polished as the bands he’s already played in. Coup brings about a likeness to other already established acts in its execution. Me being a super huge fan of Captain M.T. Reznor, I feel obligated to apply a “hawk’s eye” view for the works of the people that play in the live incarnations of Nine Inch Nails. I wouldn’t be a good and true fan if I did not do such.

“Take Control” is a very impressive song. So impressive was it that I found myself telling myself “I enjoy this new People In Planes track.” I had to respond to myself with “But this isn’t People In Planes.” Now, some might assume that when I reminded myself of that, I would be giving a negative mark to The New Regime. No, such did not take place. Actually, it was the contrary. I find People In Planes to be one of the most imaginative and creatively on cue bands that have graced my ears. Yes, that means ever. So, for Ilan to perform such a task all by his lonesome really speaks volumes. And, those volumes echo vibrantly. The drumming on the track is probably the most impressive drumming I’ve heard from such a young person since Travis Barker started letting his inhibitions go or when Dave Grohl grabbed the time keeping reigns for Nirvana. It not only keeps the pace for the song, but it, for me, showcases that the young sir should be able to bring as close to a Josh Freese element to NIN that can only be topped by Josh himself. Rubin’s attacks are on point and extremely percise. If this is him at 19(age when recorded the song), I eagerly await him breaking the 30 mark in age and where he’ll be musically. His guitar work is excellent, as well. Beautiful layering his work overtop of itself to make it sound like a sonic cloud for the chorus. During the verse section, the guitar runs with in a simple two hit manner that shows minimized genius. Surprisingly, the kid has some pretty good singing chops on him. Not many people who plays in the background section would be as willing as he to belt out vocals like he does for the chorus. The song shows massive maturity in such a young individual.

“This War Time” fully displays his California roots. I have to admit, I’m not too keen on this track. Not for the fact that it lacks, but for the fact that when compared to the first half of the album, it just seems so Pop Rockish. If I had to compare it to another band, it would have to be the current form of Incubus. And, just like that band today, Ilan is much better than this song. It’s a good song for a good band, but he’s not good. He’s great. Still, this type of song does well for people his age(and moreso his home state). I just wish that he could have used this for a soundtrack single or something else. Possibly a B-Side or something. “The Credit “We” Deserve” is of that same vein. It’s nice in it’s attempt, but why shoot for nice when you have the ability to give out awesome? Instead of Incubus, this sounds more like something from Rooney. If the show The O.C. were still active, I could seriously see the producers throw this song in the midst of an episode and on their seasonal soundtrack release.

“Order Restored” is perhaps the first song that caught my full attention. With it’s Workstation Organ pushing out something that the Phantom of the Opera would be playing if he was trapped under Guitar Center as it’s opening tune, I couldn’t help but be taken in with it’s sinister vibe. Instead of allowing the song to become cliche, he builds on top of the opening and go in a more artsy progressive alternative direction. I really can’t hold against him the fact that his voice is similar to Gareth Jones. Yet, I will say that with that being said, it does add another comparable note to People In Planes. And, again, I have to tip my hat at the young man instead of ridicule him for the almost parallel sound.

I do have another mild vexation. That comes in the form of the tracks “Time Erase” and “Haunt My Mind.” With the former, the track is Nightmare Before Christmas-ly beautiful. Though, I would have preferred him singing in a less airy tone of voice. Something with more heaviness would have completely set the proper mood for the tune. His piano work is as brilliant as some stuff that Danny Elfman would create for a Tim Burton movie. That isn’t my irritant with the songs. Actually, allow me to state such before I begin talking about “Haunt My Mind.” See, the bother deals with their actual placement on the album. Positioned at the middle of the album, I feel it forces them to lose their power that they could possess if they were in fact placed as the last two tracks on the record. “Haunt My Mind” follows up brilliantly where “Time Erase” leaves off in the dark melody since. The song enters in with complete digital sounds. Ilan, singing of his loneliness to a lost one, could make even the most melancholy of emos blush with envy. After singing the line “I count the days until I can have my freedom back,” an erupting cadence of snare attacks takes place before the full force of the additional instruments detonate in the listener(s) ears. The song is, EASILY, the most powerful of all ten tracks. With such a performance piece, it’s hard to live up to the new heights that it reached. Sadly, all the tracks after that does not. Because of that, it would have been best to place these coupled songs at the end of the album rather than the middle. Though they do showcase the end of one “side” of this release, the other “side” just seems to not be able to top what has come before it. Such a thing forces the listener to have to pause or stop the album, clear the palette, and then play the last half of the album with a clean slate. Not a good thing for an album.

Coup also has a eerily similar cover as Have A Nice Life‘s Deathconsciousness. Yes, the covers are of the same Jacques-Louis David’s painting(The Death Of Marat, to be percise). But, where Have A Nice Life have zoomed in on the image, The New Regime chose to show the entire painting(albeit with a few modifications). This similarity, though, is more than likely merely coincidental(due to the fact that Have A Nice Life are an pretty seriously independent band). In terms of the similarities in sound with the other bands, I doubt that is less coincidental and more influential. I don’t believe that Ilan is imitating them, rather taking the aspect that he enjoys from them and tries to incorporate those aspects into his own sound. With this being his first release, he shows more promise than a little bit. His multi-instrumental skills revival those of Dave Grohl(whom, I might add, also did some work with NIN). He is a talented young man through and through. The New Regime should be a name/band/project that should, rather needs, to continue forth to display the growth that Rubin will achieve throughout the years. Coup, if nothing else, is a testament that Ilan can indeed hold his own with the best of them. It also shows that Trent Reznor has just acquired a more Alternative Art Rock young version of himself.

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One Response to “The New Regime Coups In A Destined Direction”

  1. OpinionLover said

    Really liked your review of Coup. I think it’s worth noting that these are the first 10 songs ever written by Ilan Rubin. I saw that in an interview somewhere; so it’s not like he had 30 songs to choose from from and decided to go with these. I think I can also say that he probably has never heard of People in Planes. Most of his influence comes from classic rock and classical music, also mentioned in one of his interviews, so, as you point out, any likeness to bands of today is purely coincidental. More than likely, he drew from Zeppelin, Queen, The Beatles and quite possibly Muse. That said, I can’t wait to see what he brings to NIN.

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